Policies for a sustainable protein future

Plant-based and cultivated meat offer solutions to major national and global challenges.

As an NGO working towards a better food system, GFI Europe supports evidence-based policy and public research funding for these sustainable proteins.

Sustainable protein policy in Europe

Policy initiatives

The Good Food Institute Europe’s policy team focuses on three key areas to maximise the societal benefits of plant-based and cultivated meat.

Scientist researching plant-based meat

Public sector investment in open-access research will maximise the societal benefits of sustainable proteins. Learn how GFI Europe secures public funding for research and development.

Political meeting

A clear regulatory path to market is crucial for consumer confidence in sustainable proteins. Learn how GFI Europe supports evidence-based regulation.

Woman shopping

Clear labelling helps consumers to make informed and sustainable food choices. Learn how GFI Europe protects plain language for sustainable proteins.

Addressing Europe’s biggest challenges

Public R&D funding and supportive policies will ensure that sustainable proteins are affordable and accessible for all, helping to reduce the environmental impact of Europe’s food system, improve public health, and feed more people with fewer resources.

Forest

Meeting health and sustainability goals

Governments can’t meet their Paris climate agreement targets without building a more sustainable food system. Plant-based and cultivated meat address some of the major systemic causes of climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution.

Sustainable proteins are made in clean environments without exposure to faecal pathogens, and no antibiotics are needed – so these foods help to preserve life-saving antibiotics for human medicine. Their production eliminates zoonotic disease risks, helping tackle the leading causes of pandemics.

Transforming meat production will help governments to achieve their health and sustainability ambitions without relying on individual diet change.

Workers monitoring cultivators

Driving a strong economy

Scaling up the sustainable protein sector has the potential to add $1 trillion to the global economy, and countries like Singapore and Israel are already attracting major investment by providing supportive environments for plant-based and cultivated meat companies.

Europe has the scientific expertise and business leadership to become a world-leader in this field, but risks being left behind without public investment in R&D.

Just as they fund renewable energy development, the EU and national governments must support open-access research into sustainable proteins to maximise their societal benefits and create highly skilled jobs.

Family shopping in supermarket

Creating choices for consumers

Today’s food system can’t keep up with growing global demand for meat.

Plant-based and cultivated meat expand the options available to consumers and deliver the foods people enjoy today – but produced in better ways.

We support evidence-based regulation so that more foods come to market safely and properly labelled, helping consumers to make sustainable choices.




Resources for policymakers

Mosa Meat cultivated meatball

Techno-economic assessment of cultivated meat

Study of the cost of producing cultivated meat at scale, conducted by independent researchers CE Delft.

Mosa Meat cultivated beef burger

Lifecycle assessment of cultivated meat

Study of the environmental impact – including carbon footprint, land use, water use and energy use – of cultivated meat, conducted by independent researchers CE Delft.

Blue Nalu cultured fish

Cultivated meat policy recommendations

How policymakers can maximise the societal benefits of cultivated meat in relation to climate change, antibiotic resistance and other areas of human, animal and planetary health.

Our submissions to policymakers

GFI Europe makes public submissions to policymakers to share our expertise on sustainable protein policy.

Collaboration

GFI Europe works with allied organisations across the continent, including:

Latest policy news

MEPs rejected a ban on terms like veggie burger

Our favourite moments from a breakthrough year

2021 was a breakthrough year for plant-based foods, cultivated meat and fermentation.

Enough Foods Abunda mycoprotein

A cow’s worth of protein every two minutes – how fermentation could feed millions

It might get less attention than some of the latest plant-based and cultivated meat innovations – but its flexibility, low production costs and the sheer simplicity of its inputs mean…

GFI billboard in Glasgow during COP26

Food was absent from the COP26 agenda. It must be central to COP27

There is one sector that was completely absent from high level discussions, despite causing 21% of global emissions: animal agriculture.

Microscope

UK government invests in cultivated meat commercialisation

The UK government has invested £1 million to develop and commercialise stem cell lines, helping companies produce cultivated meat.

Family shopping in supermarket

Almost half of European flexitarians want more plant-based options

Nearly half of European consumers who want to eat less meat by switching to plant-based products think not enough options are available.

GFI COP26 billboard

COP26 agricultural investment must change how meat is made

GFI Europe calls on governments to direct at least 10% of the agricultural innovation funding announced at COP26 today towards changing meat production.

COP26 forest fund ‘must help move away from animal agriculture’

The Good Food Institute has welcomed a deforestation pledge – but is calling for some of the promised forest protection fund to be invested in sustainable food.

COP26: Why world leaders need to be talking about sustainable proteins

GFI will be on the ground in Glasgow, encouraging national governments to include sustainable proteins – making meat from plants and cultivating it from cells – into their national plans.